Innate Immunity in Host-Pathogen Interactions

Z. Chen, W-D. Hardt, N. Pariente, F. Randow

EMBL Heidelberg, Germany

Sunday 26 June - Wednesday 29 June 2016

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Why attend?

This symposium focuses on bringing together innate immunity and microbiology to obtain a global view of host-pathogen interactions. The talks will center around common processes, rather than a particular infectious agent or host cell, and the strategies of all types of pathogens, commensals and different host cells will be analysed. A better understanding of infectious disease will come through the simultaneous analysis of microbial and host variables, and open new avenues for treatment and prevention strategies. 

Aims

This meeting will stimulate interactions between the fields of innate immunity and microbiology, and provide a global view of host-pathogen interactions. Understanding when and how an interaction between host and microbe (virus, bacteria or parasite) leads to disease will open new avenues for treatment and prevention strategies.

Topics

  • Pathogen sensing and restriction
  • The cell biology of infection
  • Cell-autonomous immunity 
  • Host-pathogen interactions at epithelial surfaces 
  • Pathological inflammation in response to microbes

Who should attend?

Innate immunologists and microbiologists interested in understanding when and how an interaction between host and microbe (virus, bacteria or parasite) leads to disease, and how commensals influence this outcome. A better understanding of infectious disease will come through the simultaneous analysis of microbial and host variables, which requires interactions between immunologists and microbiologists, as well as tool development.