Location & dates EMBL Heidelberg, Germany 31 Mar - 3 Apr 2019
Deadlines Registration closed Abstract submission closed
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Programme

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Day 1 - Sunday 31 March 2019
TimeSpeaker
11:30-13:15 Registration and light refreshments
13:15-13:30 Opening Remarks
13:30 - 14:30
Keynote Talk
Of Neandertals and Denisovans
Svante Pääbo - Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany
14:30-17:30 Session 1 - Archaic Human Genomics
Chair: Johannes Krause
14:30-15:00

Doing more with less: 25 years of technological advances in ancient DNA
Beth Shapiro - University of California, Santa Cruz, USA

15:00-15:30

The Importance of Outliers in Large Sample Size Ancient DNA Studies
David Reich - Harvard Medical School, USA

15:30-16:00

Coffee break

16:00-16:30

Genomic tales of archaic hominin admixture
Joshua Akey - Princeton University, USA

16:30-16:45 Neandertal population histories from sediment nuclear DNA
Benjamin Vernot - Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany
16:45-17:00 A third high-coverage Neandertal genome
Fabrizio Mafessoni - Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany
17:00-17:15 Reconstructing ancient DNA fragments on a single-molecule level
Matthias Meyer - Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany
17:15-17:30 80,000 years of Neandertal genetic continuity in Europe
Stephane Peyregne - Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany
17:30-18:00

Flash Talk Session I
Poster No: 49, 51, 53, 57, 61, 67, 73, 87, 101, 59

18:00-19:00

Dinner in the EMBL Canteen

19:00-23:00 Welcome reception and poster pinning with live music by Jazz Duo
in the ATC Rooftop Lounge
Day 2 - Monday 1 April 2019
TimeSpeaker
08:15-09:00 Meet the Editors Session
09:00-12:00 Session 2 -  Human Evolution From Genome-Wide Data
Chair: David Reich
09:00-09:15

Reconstructing population separation history from whole genome sequences
Ke Wang - Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany

09:15-09:30

Large-scale whole genome sequencing of the Estonian population reveals new insights into population history
Mait Metspalu - University of Tartu, Estonia

09:30-10:00

Using ancient DNA to understand the formation and evolution of the Icelandic gene pool
Agnar Helgason - deCODE genetics, Iceland

10:00-10:30

Detecting selection using ancient DNA
Rasmus Nielsen - University of California, Berkley, USA

10:30-11:00

Coffee break

11:00-11:15

Strong selective sweeps before 45,000BP displaced archaic admixture across the human X chromosome
Kasper Munch - Aarhus University, Denmark

11:15-11:30

The demographic et adaptive history of central African hunter-gatherers and farmers
Etienne Patin - Institut Pasteur / CNRS, France

11:30-11:45 The limits of long-term selection against Neandertal introgression
Martin Petr - Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany
11:45-12:00 Phylogeography and domestication of the aurochs: an ancient genome tale
Thierry Grange - Institut Jacques Monod, France
12:00-13:30

Lunch

12:45-13:30

Meet the Speaker Session I

13:30-16:30

Session 3 - Computational Population Genetics Applied to Human Data I
Chair: Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas

13:30-14:00

Using inference of human history to gain medically relevant insights
Ida Moltke - University of Copenhagen, Denmark

14:00-14:30

Probabilistic methods to estimate demography from whole genome sequences
Richard Durbin - University of Cambridge, UK

14:30-15:00

Investigating human history from modern and ancient genomes: New methods and insights
Stephan Schiffels - Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany

15:00-15:30

Coffee break

15:30-15:45

Ancient genomes from the Bavarian Lech Valley suggest stratified patrilocal households in the European Bronze Age
Philipp Stockhammer - Ludwig Maximilians University Munich & Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany

15:45-16:00 The genomic history of the Iberian Peninsula over the past 8000 years
Iñigo Olalde - Harvard Medical School, USA
16:00-16:15 Ancient human genome-wide data from a 3000-year interval in the Caucasus corresponds with eco-geographic regions
Wolfgang Haak - Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany
16:15-16:30 The Geometry of Admixture
Benjamin Peter - Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany
16:30-17:00

Flash Talk Session II
Poster No: 46, 48, 50, 54, 62, 91, 93, 95, 105, 109

17:00-19:00 Poster Session I (odd numbers)
from 19:00 Free evening
Day 3 - Tuesday 2 April 2019
TimeSpeaker
08:15-09:00 Career Workshop
Chair: Rachel Coulthard-Graf
09:00-12:00 Session 4 - Computational Population Genetics Applied to Human Data II
Chair: David Reich
09:00-09:15 The paleogenetic reconstruction of the spread of the domestic cat reconstructs past human migrations, trading and warfaring routes
Eva-Maria Geigl - Institut Jacques Monod, France
09:15-09:30 Genetic reconstruction of human dwelling environment in the Upper Palaeolithic South Caucasus
Mariya Antonosyan - Russian-Armenian University, Armenia
09:30-10:00

Representing population structure with effective migration surfaces
John Novembre - University of Chicago, USA

10:00-10:30

Tracing canids through the human past
Pontus Skoglund - The Francis Crick Institute, UK

10:30-11:00 Coffee break
11:00-11:15 The Anglo-Saxon migration and formation of the early English gene pool
Joscha Gretzinger - Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany
11:15-11:30 Reconstructing the human past of Eurasian migration: from molecules to history
Michael McCormick - Harvard University, USA
11:30-11:45 Ancient admixture from an extinct ape lineage into bonobos
Martin Kuhlwilm - Institut de Biologia Evolutiva, CSIC-Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain
11:45-12:00 Ancient Brazilian Genomics
Diana Ivette Cruz Dávalos - University of Lausanne, Switzerland
12:00-13:30 Lunch
12:45-13:30 Meet the Speaker Session II
13:30-16:30 Session 5 - Ancient Human population dynamics
Chair: Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas
13:30-14:00

Genetic history on the Tibetan Plateau in the last 5,200 years
Qiaomei Fu - Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

14:00-14:30

Inferring the evolution of early humans from complete genome sequences
Mattias Jakobsson - Uppsala University, Sweden

14:30-15:00

Paleogenomic insights into the peopling of the Americas
Maanasa Raghavan - University of Chicago, USA

15:00-15:30

Coffee break

15:30-16:00

Integrating Written Sources, Archaeology, and Genomics: A cemetery-based Paleogenomic Approach to recent Human Population History
Patrick J. Geary - Institute for Advanced Study, USA

16:00-16:15

Population history of modern humans from the Early Upper Palaeolithic in Europe
Mateja Hajdinjak - Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany

16:15-16:30

Early human dispersals within the Americas
J. Víctor Moreno-Mayar - University of Lausanne, Switzerland

16:30-17:00

Flash Talk Session III
Poster No: 66, 70, 74, 80, 84, 88, 94, 100, 104, 108

17:00-19:00

Poster Session II (even numbers)

19:00-20:30 Conference Dinner in the EMBL Canteen
20:30-00:00 Conference Party with the "Who2ladies"
in the ATC Foyer
Day 4 - Wednesday 3 April 2019
TimeSpeaker
09:00-12:45 Session 6 - Domestication & Microbial Evolution
Chair: Johannes Krause
09:00-09:30

Genomic reconstructions of ancient pathogens
Kirsten Bos - Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany

09:30-10:00

The archaeology of beneficial microbes: from the human microbiome to milk
Christina Warinner - Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany

10:00-10:30

Coffee break

10:30-11:00

Tracking six millenia of horse selection, admixture and management with complete genome time-series
Ludovic Orlando - Toulouse University, France

11:00-11:30

Human gene expression evolution - a mammalian perspective
Henrik Kaessmann - Center for Molecular Biology of Heidelberg University, Germany

11:30-11:45

6,500 year old Salmonella enterica genomes link human-host adaptation to animal domestication
Felix M. Key - Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

11:45-12:00

5,000-year-old genome of Yersinia pestis sheds light on the emergence and rapid spread of plague during the Neolithic and Bronze Age
Nicolas Rascovan - MIVEGEC Institute, France

12:00-12:15

Uncovering the genomic history of the second plague pandemic through analysis of historical Yersinia pestis genomes
Maria Spyrou - Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany

12:15-12:30 Poster Prize Award Ceremony and Closing Remarks
12:30 Packed Lunch